Implementing SmartConnect: Introduction

eOne SolutionsThis post is part of the series on Implementing SmartConnect, an integration tool from eOne Solutions, which can take data from any source and integrate it into Microsoft Dynamics GP (and other systems such as Microsoft Dynamics CRM or Sales Force amongst others). It has a drag and drop interface to make creating integrations quick and easy for all users rather than just developers (as many integration tools target).

SmartConnect provides an alternative to Integration Manager, which is part of the Microsoft Dynamics GP Customisation Pack. While Integration Manager allows users to create and run integrations on an ad hoc basis, SmartConnect provides much more functionality, such as the ability to schedule integrations, poll a folder to load all files within and load data from many different data sources including Excel spreadsheets, transform data and provides a web service which can be called from any application.

There are three types of integration which can be created in SmartConnect:

  • Bulk Data Sources – Bulk data sources are configured to look at fixed data locations (such as a particular file or folder). The SmartConnect Scheduler can be used to define a schedule on which bulk data source integrations should be run.
  • Change Data Sources – A change data source will track all data changes since the map last ran successfully; based on the schedule, it will execute a SmartConnect map to integrate the data.
  • Real Time Data Sources – Data is integrated in real time from any Microsoft Dynamics GP window or direct from Dynamics CRM to any destination.

Continue reading “Implementing SmartConnect: Introduction”

Implementing SmartConnect: Who Are eOne Solutions?

eOne SolutionsThis post is part of the series on Implementing SmartConnect, an integration tool from eOne Solutions, which can take data from any source and integrate it into Microsoft Dynamics GP (and other systems such as Microsoft Dynamics CRM or Sales Force amongst others). It has a drag and drop interface to make creating integrations quick and easy for all users rather than just developers (as many integration tools target).

I’ve done a small number of posts before on eOne’s SmartList Builder previously, but this is the first series of posts I’ve done on one of their products.

I’m sure everyone using Microsoft Dynamics GP is aware of who eOne Solutions are, but in case you don’t, eOne are a Microsoft Dynamics GP ISV (Independent Software Vendor) based in Fargo, North Dakota, and with offices in Texas and Australia.

They have created a number of products which either install into Microsoft Dynamics GP or which integrate with it:

  1. SmartConnect – the subject of this series is an integration tool which allows you to integrate lots of different systems with Microsoft Dynamics GP.
  2. Extender – allows you to create new windows and forms for Microsoft Dynamics GP, without needing the services of a developer.
  3. SmartView – provides an alternate, fast and flexible interface to the existing SmartLists.
  4. Node Builder – allows easy creation of new eConnect nodes to be created without the need for a developer.
  5. Flexicoder – allows you to automatically recode Sales transactions with configurable rules and references.
  6. SmartPost – automates the posting of Microsoft Dynamics GP batches.
  7. SmartList Builder – enables both the creation of new SmartList objects or modification of existing ones. Up to 32 tables can be linked and tables can be standard GP tables, any Third Party (ISV) tables, any SQL table, SQL views or SQL Scripts, other SmartLists or Extender resources.

I’ve worked with many clients using SmartList Builder and it has proven to be a very popular tool with them for the ease and flexibility of creating new SmartLists. In more recent times, I’ve also done work with Extender, SmartConnect and NodeBuilder. In this series, I am going to be focused on SmartConnect, but over the coming year, I’ll also be taking a look at some of the other products.

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Implementing SmartConnect: Series Index

eOne SolutionsSmartConnect is an integration tool from eOne Solutions which can take data from any source and integrate it into Microsoft Dynamics GP (and other systems such as Microsoft Dynamics CRM or Sales Force amongst others). It has a drag and drop interface to make creating integrations quick and easy for all users rather than just developers (as many integration tools target).

I’ve known about SmartConnect for quite a long time now, but have only just started working with it and thought a series of posts on the installation and configuration process might be useful to do.

The index below will update as each post goes live if you are reading directly here (if you’re reading on a syndicated version, you will need to check back to the original post).

Implementing SmartConnect
Who Are eOne Solutions?
Introduction
SmartConnect vs. Integration Manager
System Requirements
Prerequisites
Installation
Configure Windows Service
Configure Windows Service
Assign SQL Login Security
Install GP Addin
Update GP Cache
Console First Run
Configure GP Connector

How to Install Microsoft SQL Server 2017: Download SSRS 2017

Microsoft SQL ServerIn this short series of posts, I am going to be covering the installation of Microsoft SQL Server 2017; the installation process for this version is somewhat different to previous ones, in that SQL Server Management Studio and SQL Server Reporting Services have been separated out from the main installer.

The series index can be found here. I am not a SQL expert and this series of posts is intended only for use on demo or test environment and not production ones.

This is a very late addition to this series of posts; I recently came to install SQL Server 2017 on a new machine which did not have an Internet connection and so needed to download the installer and copy itto the new machine.

In the installation post I used the download option in the installer, but didn;t include the direct download link.

Well, to remedy that, here is the download link to the latest version of SSRS 2017.

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Local by Flywheel: Review

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

Over the course of this series, I’ve installed Local by Flywheel, created and tested the default WordPress site and also accessed the local development site from the Internet.

Overall I have been very impressed with Local by Flywheel. It is a very easy installation, flexible yet simple setup and easy enough to access both internally and externally.

It would be nice, in future, to see ClassicPress available as a default install rather than having to either migrate the default WordPress one or manually replace it with ClassicPress, but that might come with time as ClassicPress grows.

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Local by Flywheel: Test Updated Site Works

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

The change to the wp.config file is the last of the changes needed to complete the migration of the live site into Local by Flywheel.

With the complete, you can access the site and test to make sure that everything has migrated correctly.

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Local by Flywheel: Update wp.config

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

The final step of migrating a live site into Local by Flywheel is to change the wp.config file; this is what tells the WordPres site which database to connect and the credentials to do so.

The settings required for the wp.config file can be found on the Database tab in Local by Flywheel:

Database tab showing connection settings

Continue reading “Local by Flywheel: Update wp.config”

Local by Flywheel: Upload Own Files

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

With the database restored, the next step is to upload the files from the live site. I used FileZilla to FTP to the site and download the files.

One you have the files downloaded, they need to be copied to the Local by Flywheel version of the site. The fields are accessible using Windows Explorer. The easiest way to get to the folder, is via the Overview tab. On this tab, click the open button (arrow in circle) below the site name:

Site Overview tab showing the open button.

This will launch Windows Explorer to the Local Sites folder; expand the required site >> app >> public; all of the files in here can be deleted and replaced with the ones downloaded from the live site:

Windows Explorer showing the site

As well as uploading files from a live site, you could also upload the files to transfer your site from WordPress to ClassicPress.

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Local by Flywheel: Update Links in Database

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

In the last post of this series, I restored the database from my live blog into Local by Flywheel. The next step is to change the references in the database from my live domain address (http://www.azurecurve.co.uk) to the one local to Local by Flywheel (azurecurve.local).

I did this by running the following SQL query against the database using mySQL Workbench:

/*
Created by Ian Grieve of azurecurve|Ramblings of a Dynamics GP Consultant (http://www.azurecurve.co.uk)
This code is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Int).
*/
UPDATE
	local.azc_options
		SET
			post_content = 
						REPLACE(
								post_content
                                , 'http://www.azurecurve.co.uk'
                                , 'http://azurecurve.local');
UPDATE
	local.azc_posts
		SET
			post_content = 
						REPLACE(
								post_content
                                , 'http://www.azurecurve.co.uk'
                                , 'http://azurecurve.local');

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Local by Flywheel: Upload Own Database

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

To migrate an existing site into Local by Flywheel, the first step is to restore your database. To make the backup, I used the mySQL Workbench, but many tools can be used to make and restore a backup of the database.

The first step is to backup your database from your current web host. Once you have this backup file, you need to restore it to the Local by Flywheel database.

The connection details for this database are available from the Local by Flywheel app on the Database tab:

azurecurve Database page

With these details you can use mySQL Workbench to connect and restore the database.

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