ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Install Git for Windows

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

A key prerequisite for installing TortoiseGit is an already installed (command line) Git client which provides a git.exe. The recommended one if Git for Windows which is, the only one, used by the developers of TortoiseGit. The application can be downloaded from Git for Windows:

Download Git for Windows

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ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: What is TortoiseGit?

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

Project on GitHub can be managed through the web interface, but it can be very useful to have an application installed on the computer(s) on which you are developing. I’ve been a longtime user of TortoiseSVN for developing my WordPress Plugins, so when looking around for a Windows GIT client, it seemed natural to use TortoiseGit.

TortoiseGit is a Git revision control client, implemented as a Windows shell extension and, useful for me due to prior experience, based on TortoiseSVN; TortoiseGit is released under the GNU General Public License so is free for use.

TortoiseGit is written as a shell extension which gives you access to commands by right-clicking a file or folder. Over the next few posts, I will be taking a look at both the installation and use of TortoiseGit.

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit
What is TortoiseGit?
Install Git for Windows

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Series Index

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well.

While you can manage your uploads and everything from the GitHub website, I decided it would be somewhat easier to use a Windows application and having used TortoiseSVN, I opted for TortoiseGit. This post is the series index for a sub-series of posts on using TortoiseGit, which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit
What is TortoiseGit?
Install Git for Windows

This is a weekend series of posts with new posts going live over the next few weeks. If you’re reading this on azurecurve|Ramblings of a Dynamics GP Consultant the index will update automatically.

Separately compress all sub folders

7-ZipI started using WordPress for this blog when it launched in June 2011 until last year when, with Gutenberg on the horizon, I migrated to ClassicPress. This migration was easy as ClassicPress is a hard-fork of WordPress 4.9. As part od the migration I opted to rewrite all of my plugins to improve them and make them more secure.

I have 32 publically available plugins for ClassicPress. I’ve recently made changes to all of the plugins which means I need to make a release of them.

This partly done by committing the changes to Git Hub and making a tag, but you also need to add a zip file. There are commands to do this automatically on GitHub, but I am quote new so am opting to create the zips myself and upload them.

To do this I wanted to automatically compress all of the plugin folders, but exclude any hidden folders (such as the .git folder). I did some exploring and found the required command on Stack Overflow using 7-zip:

for /d %%X in (*) do "c:\Program Files\7-Zip\7z.exe" a -xr!.git\ -xr!*~ "%%X.zip" "%%X\"

The question which had previously been asked was this one and the two answers I used were this and this.