azurecurve ClassicPress Plugins: Avatars

ClassicPress PluginsThis is part of the azurecurve ClassicPress Plugins which introduces the plugins I have available for ClassicPress.

The plugin I am going to cover in this post, is a brand new one; Avatars.

Functionality

The Avatars plugin has three key pieces of functionality:

  • Upload an image file using an FTP client, to the plugins images folder, called CustomAvatar.png and, via the Discussion settings page, set this as the default avatar to replace the Gravatars used by default.
  • The admin can, via the plugin Settings page, set an option to allow only local avatars which will use the default avatar rather than any Gravatar a user might be using.
  • Users can upload their own avatar which is stored in the media library.

Demo

This site is using the Avatars plugin; you can see this in the first comment of this post where you can see my IG avatar.

Download

The plugin can be downloaded via my Development site.

azurecurve ClassicPress Plugins: Series Index

ClassicPress PluginsI’ve been involved with the ClassicPress project for a while now in a few different ways (such as writing FAQs and drafting plugin directory rules).

One of the things I have been working on is rewriting my plugins, to both improve the functionality and also to improve their adherence to coding standards and best practice. There was quite a few ways where I was not following best practice or where I had code which was not very secure.

Some plugins have had a near total rewrite while others have just been updated to do things in a more standardised and recommend way. Part of the reason I have done this, in fact been able to do this, is how welcoming and willing to offer advice the people in the ClassicPress community have been.

I have also written a number of new plugins which are all available for ClassicPress (they will also work with WordPress, but I have not submitted them to the WordPress Plugin Repository.

There have been quite a few people who have been willing to answer questions and offer assistance, but I will single out John Alarcon, known in the ClassicPress Community as Code Potent, who has gone out of his way to be of great help.

In this series of posts, I am going to give a brief introduction to each of the plugins I have available, along with links to plugin demos or examples and to my Development site where further details, download and support links are available.

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Installing ClassicPress: Change Authentication Keys and Salts

ClassicPressThis post is part of the series on Installing ClassicPress; ClassicPress is an open source fork of WordPress which aims to target the business market or those looking for a CMS with a focus on security, stability and flexibility.

Now that we know that the new ClassicPress site works I’d recommend editing your new wp-config.php file to change the authentication keys and salts. You will need to use your FTP client to make this change.

Open and edit your wp-config.php file and find the highlighted section. These are the authentication keys and salts used by ClassicPress for cookies and the like which it is recommended you change:

wp-config.php file with authentication keys and salts highlighted

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Installing ClassicPress: First Login

ClassicPressThis post is part of the series on Installing ClassicPress; ClassicPress is an open source fork of WordPress which aims to target the business market or those looking for a CMS with a focus on security, stability and flexibility.

With ClassicPress installed, the next step in the installation is to test that the site works.

If you navigate to your web address followed by /wp-login.php you can enter the admin credentials created during the installation:

ClassicPress login page

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Installing ClassicPress: Installing

ClassicPressThis post is part of the series on Installing ClassicPress; ClassicPress is an open source fork of WordPress which aims to target the business market or those looking for a CMS with a focus on security, stability and flexibility.

With ClassicPress downloaded, we can now install it on our website.

The file which was downloaded is a zip file which needs to be unzipped and uploaded to the web site using an FTP client. For this post, I am assuming you have done this already.

With ClassicPress uploaded, we can navigate to the installation web page; this is your usual web address. When the page loads, select your language and click Continue:

ClassicPress Setup Configuration

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Installing ClassicPress: Download

ClassicPressThis post is part of the series on Installing ClassicPress; ClassicPress is an open source fork of WordPress which aims to target the business market or those looking for a CMS with a focus on security, stability and flexibility.

To download ClassicPress, visit their website and click the green Download ClassicPress button:

ClassicPress site with Download ClassicPress button

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Installing ClassicPress: Series Index

ClassicPressWhen I started this blog seven years ago, I opted to use WordPress as the content management system to build it on. It was both easy to use and flexible. I’ve taken advantage of that flexibility over the years to write a number of plugins to add new functionality.

However, in the most recent iterations of WordPress, ostensibly an open source project, but actually controlled by Automattic, has introduced the Gutenberg block editor which has, in my opinion, fundamentally broken the easy writing experience of WordPress. This lead me to start looking around at alternatives and, quite naturally due to the duration and extent of my use of WordPress, the hard fork of WordPress known as ClassicPress. The initial impetus around the fork was against Gutenberg, but it has taken a wider view of the issues around WordPress and is trying to set itself up so that no one person can dictate the future of the project (as Matt Mullenweg dictates for WordPress).

Having gotten involved in the project, I have helped to update some documentation (such as FAQs), draft some proposed rules for the plugin directory (intended for ClassicPress v2) and assist in a few other small ways (unfortunately, my PHP is not good enough to help update core files).

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Local by Flywheel: Review

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

Over the course of this series, I’ve installed Local by Flywheel, created and tested the default WordPress site and also accessed the local development site from the Internet.

Overall I have been very impressed with Local by Flywheel. It is a very easy installation, flexible yet simple setup and easy enough to access both internally and externally.

It would be nice, in future, to see ClassicPress available as a default install rather than having to either migrate the default WordPress one or manually replace it with ClassicPress, but that might come with time as ClassicPress grows.

Local by Flywheel: Test Updated Site Works

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

The change to the wp.config file is the last of the changes needed to complete the migration of the live site into Local by Flywheel.

With the complete, you can access the site and test to make sure that everything has migrated correctly.

Local by Flywheel: Update wp.config

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

The final step of migrating a live site into Local by Flywheel is to change the wp.config file; this is what tells the WordPres site which database to connect and the credentials to do so.

The settings required for the wp.config file can be found on the Database tab in Local by Flywheel:

Database tab showing connection settings

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