ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Create Release

GitHubWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with GitHub.

When developing with GitHub, you can make a release; this is a way of grouping together all of the changes since the last release to make it easy to download that particular code set. One point to note, is that while GitHub will automatically create a zip of the source code, this isn’t suitable to use for a ClassicPress release as it will include -master in the contained directory name. However, you can upload a zip file containing the code in the correct folder.

To create a new release, load the repository page on GitHub and click the releases button (red ringed):

Repository page

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Create Release”

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Revert Last Commit

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

When you have changes committed to GitHub, you need to make a release of your plugin. Making a release has two main benefits:

  1. It labels the files in the repository with a tag making it easy to download a particular version of the plugin.
  2. You can upload a zip file containing the plugin folder giving a zip file which users can download and upload to their ClassicPress site.

To create a release, open the GitHub repository page and click the releases link at the top (ringed in red):

Github repository

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Revert Last Commit”

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Commit

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

Once the repository has been cloned and changes made, you need to submit the changes back to the repository to keep control of changes. This is referred to as a “commit”. To commit your change, right-click the folder (or file) to commit and select Git Commit -> “master” on the context menu:

Git Commit

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Commit”

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Install Git for Windows

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

A key prerequisite for installing TortoiseGit is an already installed (command line) Git client which provides a git.exe. The recommended one if Git for Windows which is, the only one, used by the developers of TortoiseGit. The application can be downloaded from Git for Windows:

Download Git for Windows

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Install Git for Windows”

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: What is TortoiseGit?

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

Project on GitHub can be managed through the web interface, but it can be very useful to have an application installed on the computer(s) on which you are developing. I’ve been a longtime user of TortoiseSVN for developing my WordPress Plugins, so when looking around for a Windows GIT client, it seemed natural to use TortoiseGit.

TortoiseGit is a Git revision control client, implemented as a Windows shell extension and, useful for me due to prior experience, based on TortoiseSVN; TortoiseGit is released under the GNU General Public License so is free for use.

TortoiseGit is written as a shell extension which gives you access to commands by right-clicking a file or folder. Over the next few posts, I will be taking a look at both the installation and use of TortoiseGit.

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit
What is TortoiseGit?
Install Git for Windows
Install TortoiseGit for Windows
First run
Update
Clone Repository
Commit
Revert Last Commit

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit: Series Index

TortoiseGitWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well.

While you can manage your uploads and everything from the GitHub website, I decided it would be somewhat easier to use a Windows application and having used TortoiseSVN, I opted for TortoiseGit. This post is the series index for a sub-series of posts on using TortoiseGit, which is a sub-series of the ClassicPress Development with GitHub series.

ClassicPress Development with TortoiseGit
What is TortoiseGit?
Install Git for Windows
Install TortoiseGit for Windows
First run
Update
Clone Repository
Commit
Revert Last Commit

This is a weekend series of posts with new posts going live over the next few weeks. If you’re reading this on azurecurve|Ramblings of a Dynamics GP Consultant the index will update automatically.

ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Delete Repository

GitHubWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with GitHub.

Over the last few posts, I’ve shown how to create and use the GutHub website for managing repositories. I’ve found that every so often when working with GitHub, I need to delete a repository. This is fairly simple to do, but only delete ones which you are sure are no longer needed, as there is no undo delete function.

To delete a repository, load it on the GitHub website and click the Settings button:

Repository webpage

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Delete Repository”

ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Commit Files

GitHubWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with GitHub.

With a repository created, we can now upload the existing project files. Do this by visiting the repository page and click the Upload files button:

GitHub repository page

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Commit Files”

ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Create Repository

GitHubWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with GitHub.

With us now signed up for GitHub, we can create our first repository. From your dashboard (which is https://github.com/ followed by your username), click the New repository button:

Create a new repository on GitHub

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Create Repository”

ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Sign up for GitHub

GitHubWhen I started developing plugins for ClassicPress I decided that I needed to be using source control. As ClassicPress is intending to use GitHub for their plugin directory, it made sense for me to use it as well. This post is part of a series on ClassicPress Development with GitHub.

The first step to using GitHub for developing with ClasssicPress, is to create a GitHub account; navigate to the landing page, enter a Username, Email and Password and click the large green Sign up for Github button:

Sign up for GitHub

Continue reading “ClassicPress Development with GitHub: Sign up for GitHub”