Working with Power Automate Solutions: What Types of Solution Are There?

Power AutomateThis article is part of the Working with Power Automate Solutions series and of the larger Working with Power Automate series I am writing on my experiences working with the Power Automate, which is part of the Power Platform from Microsoft. I also have a related series of articles on Power Automate with Microsoft Dynamics 365 BC.

As I briefly mentioned in the last post, where I introduced solutions, there are two types of solution:

  1. Unmanaged
  2. Managed

Unmanaged solutions are used in development environments while the flows are being created or maintained. Unmanaged solutions can be exported either as unmanaged or managed; it is recommended that exported unmanaged versions of your solutions be checked into your source control system.

When an unmanaged solution is deleted, only the solution container is deleted; all of the unmanaged flows and other components remain in place.

Managed solutions are used to deploy to any environment that isn’t a development environment; this includes QA, UAT and production environments.

As an ALM best practice, managed solutions should be generated by exporting an unmanaged solution as managed and considered a build artifact. Managed solutions can be serviced independently from other managed solutions in an environment.

Some of the key features of a managed solution are:

  • Managed solutions cannot be exported.
  • When a managed solution is deleted (uninstalled), all of the flows and other components within it are removed.
  • Components in a managed solution cannot be directly edited. To edit managed components, they must first be added to an unmanaged solution. When this is done, a dependency between the unmanaged customisations and the managed solution is created. When a dependency exists, the managed solution can’t be uninstalled until the dependency is removed.
  • Some managed components can’t be edited. To verify whether a component can be edited, view the Managed properties.

Further information on solutions in general and the types of solution are available on Microsoft Learn.

Working with Power Automate

Working with Power Automate
What is Power Automate?
What Type of Flow Are Available?
What Type of Cloud Flows Are Available?
Power Automate with Business Central
Working with Power Automate Solutions: What Are Solutions?
Working with Power Automate Solutions: What Types of Solution Are There?
Working with Power Automate Solutions: What is a Solution Publisher?
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Create a Solution Publisher
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Create a Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Publish a Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Version Numbering for Solutions
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Exporting An Unmanaged Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Importing An Unmanaged Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Exporting A Managed Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Importing A Managed Solution
Working with Power Automate Solutions: Change the Managed Properties of a Solution Component
Create a Visio Diagram of a Flow
What Are Environment Variables and Why Should They be Used?
Create an Environment Variable
Create a New Cloud Flow From a Template
Managing Large Flows
What is a Scope?
Example of How to Use a Scope
Best Practice For Using Scopes
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: What are Child Flows?
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Create a Child Flow
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Change Run Only Users For Child Flow
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Add a Child Flow To a Parent Flow
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Test the Parent/Child Flow Examples
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Error Encountered Saving a Flow Which Calls a Child Flow
Working with Power Automate Child Flows: Error Encountered With Surprise Extra Parameters for a Child Flow