Local by Flywheel: Download

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

Local by Flywheel can be downloaded from the homepage by clicking the Free Download button:

Free download of Local by Flywheel

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Local by Flywheel: What is Local by Flywheel?

Local By FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

Local by Flywheel is a development tool for WordPress which provides a very easy way of creating a definable environment hosting a WordPress instance. As well as deploying an OS, it also deploys a web server, PHP and everything else required to develop or test a WordPress site, including WordPress itself.

Key features listed on the Local by Flywheel site are:

  • Speed and simplicity – Flywheel is fast and functional and those features make this the slickest local WordPress development application in the world.
  • One-click WordPress installation – Simple creation of a local WordPress site, so you don’t have to bother with setting it up yourself.
  • Simple demo URLs – Create shareable URLs to demo your local WordPress sites to clients, collaborators or friends.
  • Hassle-free local SSL support – Any site created via Local by Flywheel will automatically have a self-signed certificate created.
  • SSH + WP-CLI Access – Simple root SSH access to individual sites, so you can tinker around if your heart desires.
  • Flexible environment options – Hot-swap between NGINX or Apache 2.4, or switch between PHP versions. Everything will stay up and running.

The extensive set of features can be read here.

The Community edition of Local by Flywheel is free, but there are additional versions coming soon which provide more functionality; details are here.

In the next few posts, I’m going to cover the download, installation and use of Local by Flywheel.

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Local by Flywheel: Who Are Flywheel?

FlywheelThis post is part of the series on Local by Flywheel.

Before I start delving into Local by Flywheel itself, I thought it would be appropriate to do a post on who Flywheel themselves are. Flywheel are a managed WordPress hosting provider aimed at developers and agencies who create sites for others. The aim is to remove the hassle of hosting and allow you to focus on streamlining your processes and work for clients.

Full details on the services available from Flywheel are available from here.

The Flywheel site also has additional resources available in the form of ebooks aiming to help you create fast, secure sites on WordPress.

Local by Flywheel is one of the tools they’ve created to help develop new sites or features for sites. In the next post, I’ll take a more detailed look at what Local by Flywheel is and how it works.

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Local by Flywheel: Series Index

Local By FlywheelI’ve recently started taking a look at ClassicPress, a fork of WordPress 4.9.8 (the one without the Gutenberg block editor). In order to test the migration from WordPress to ClassicPress, I needed a website which had PHP 7 (and due to my web host being crap; arvixe to those interested) I needed another way.

I was looking for a free webhost when I stumbled across Local by Flywheel which described itself as:

The #1 local WordPress development tool

This sounded like it would be very useful for the testing requirement that I had. In this series of posts, I’m going to be taking a look at the installation and use of Local by Flywheel. This post is the series index and will automatically update as each post goes live.

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GitHub Announces New Unlimited Repos & Unitifed Enterprise Offering

GitHubI’ve recently been taking a look at ClassicPress and one of the subjects that came up was that it might, for the plugin directory, use GutHub instead of SVN like WordPress.

I create an account and started looking into creating repositories for my plugins. Hot all of my plugins are on that site however, as not all have been released to the public. Some of them are only going to be usable to me (for example plugins drive both the GP Table Reference and my distilleries website) and you were limited on GitHub to a certain number of private repositories.

However, GitHub yesterday announced the following:

  • GitHub Free now includes unlimited private repositories. For the first time, developers can use GitHub for their private projects with up to three collaborators per repository for free. Many developers want to use private repos to apply for a job, work on a side project, or try something out in private before releasing it publicly. Starting today, those scenarios, and many more, are possible on GitHub at no cost. Public repositories are still free (of course—no changes there) and include unlimited collaborators.
  • GitHub Enterprise is the new unified product for Enterprise Cloud (formerly GitHub Business Cloud) and Enterprise Server (formerly GitHub Enterprise). Organizations that want the flexibility to use GitHub in a cloud or self-hosted configuration can now access both at one per-seat price. And with GitHub Connect, these products can be securely linked, providing a hybrid option so developers can work seamlessly across both environments.

The second point isn’t relevant to me, but the first might be useful as it will allow me to store both my public and private plugins in the same place.

More details are available from the GitHub blog.

Installing TortoiseSVN: Commit Changes

TortoiseSVNThis post is part of the series on installing TortoiseSVN which is I use in the development of WordPress plugins.

Once you’ve finished making the required changes to the plugin, the files need to be uploaded to the plugin repository; the example I am using in this post, is some changes I made to the azurecurve Floating Featured Image plugin.

To upload the changes, right-click on the top-level plugin folder and select SVN Commit:

Right-click SVN Commit

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Installing TortoiseSVN: Checkout from Repository

TortoiseSVNThis post is part of the series on installing TortoiseSVN which is I use in the development of WordPress plugins.

With TortoiseSVN installed, we can connect to an existing plugin repository; in this example I am using my azurecurve Series Index plugin.

After creating the development folder, TortoiseSVN is available from the right-click context menu. Create the development folder, right click and selectSVN Checkout:

Right-click context menu

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Installing TortoiseSVN: Installing

TortoiseSVNThis post is part of the series on installing TortoiseSVN which is I use in the development of WordPress plugins.

The first step in installing TortoiseSVN is to download the latest version. You can download it from the TortoiseSVN website:

TortoiseSVN website

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Installing TortoiseSVN: Series Index

TortoiseSVNDepending on how much of this blog you read, you might be aware that I have been adding functionality by writing pluginsg for WordPress which I have been publishing via the WordPress Plugin Repository.

I did try writing a blog on my Development site, but that didn’t go too well; pretty much a case of out of sight, out of mind. I have some things I want to blog about, so will be posting them here.

The first of these is an installation of TortoiseSVN which I used to upload/download updates to plugins I’ve developed.

Over the course of this series, I’ll be installing TortoiseSVN, connecting to a plugin repsitory and committing changes made.

Installing TortoiseSVN
Installing
Checkout from Repository
Commit Changes

Installing Notepad++: Plugin Manager Removed in Notepad++ 7.5

Notepad++This post is part of the series on installing Notepad++’.

The plugin manager was never an integral part of Notepad++, but always shipped as part of the standard installer. This changed as of version 7.5.

I only recently discovered this when installing Notepad++ on a newy rebuilt PC. I came to install the Compare plugin and couldn’t find the Plugin Manager entry on the Plugins menu:

Notepad++ Plugin Manager

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